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Accessing Site from Inside a NAT router


Anonymous

Anonymous
I have tried again and again to figure out how to access my geeklog site internally... the problem: everyone can see my site from the outside yet when I try to do http://localhost or http://127.0.0.1 it forwards to the site url I have placed in the geeklog config file. Then it times out since I am behind the NAT. Does anyone know how I can bypass this? I have tried port forwarding the computer to 1417-1420 to no avail. (I have three computers in the network and I have port forwarding (80) set to go to my dual867 running 10.2.6) I am using dyndns dynamic dns...could this be causing part of the problem? It is frustrating becasue I cannot administrate my great new geeklog site! if anyone has any suggestions at all I would be more than appreciative. Thank you M. Chase
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tyrael

Anonymous
Hi there !!! Just one question before i continue...are you using a windows OS or *nix one...? In both case, there is one solution that i've tested with my own web server. My network conf is almost the same as yours Just for info: - I use Dyndns.org services for dynamic DNS with a daemon on my OpenBSD machine to update my public IP - The web server runs behind a NAT router on wich i configured port forwarding for http (80 TCP) a few other ports - In my geeklog installation, i put the domain name, so that everyone asking to see my website may follow up the dyndns system to access my machine behind the NAT That's the context : One solution i found, to access my web server inside the private LAN is to add a line in the hosts configuration For example, on a windows NT/2000/XP System : -Locate the file named "hosts" (must be somewhere around WINNT/System32/...) - And add this kind of line : www.yourwebsite.com 10.0.0.0.1 On a *nix system the "host" file must be somewhere around /etc/hosts on typical system That's all ! So when the machine will look for www.yourwebsite.com, it will first look in the host files and encounter the private IP address for your website....so you will be able to access your website within your LAN...so forget about port forwarding cycling and other kind of things....the solution to edit the host file is the simplest and the most efficient way... I've tried this for my system and it works perfectly... Hope this help... See u around Tyrael
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Anonymous

Anonymous
If ur on OSX server, try playing with realms - the host settings IN OSX server are picky, so u have to specify EACH name you want it to answer to, even if it's 127.0.0.1 or localhost. I have Apache2/ PHP4.3.1 compiled from scratch on my OSX non-server box, and it works fine.
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Status: offline

ndarlow

Forum User
Junior
Registered: 30/06/02
Posts: 31
A variation on the hosts file theme is to run a private DNS server using local network IP addresses. This DNS server can forward to external DNS servers for hosts it knows nothing about. I run a dynamic domain through DynDns.org on my FreeBSD server. The local DNS resolves my internal 192.168.0/24 network. Things like dynamic zone updates for DHCP-addressed clients is another useful feature you can implement with this scheme which a hosts file alone couldn't provide. Regards, Neil Darlow M.Sc.
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Anonymous

Anonymous
Thanks for the help... I am using a *nix installation so your advice worked perfectly by putting that line in the host file. Much appreciated and happy geekin! m. chase
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